Description

Description

  • 1921 was the only year Sheridans were produced.
  • They were a GM product to fill the gate between Chevrolet and Buick.
  • Sheridans were “assembled” cars, which meant they were built of components made by various manufacturers.

 

Story

Story

Sheridan was a General Motors product intended to fill the price gap between Chevrolet and Buick.  Sheridan was an “assembled” automobile, which meant it was built from a variety of “off the shelf” components produced by other companies.  They were equipped with Northway engines, Hoosier dry-disc clutches and Warner 3-speed transmissions.

Sheridan was advertized as “The Car Complete” and advertisements explained it was complete in beauty, complete in comfort, complete in conveniences and complete in mechanical excellence. The line consisted of four models: open, roadster, coupe and sedan, with four or eight cylinders engines.

Introduced in August 1920, Sheridan production ended the last week of July 1921, when the assembly plant was purchased by W.C. Durant to build Durant Six and Princeton automobiles.

Video

Discussion

Leave a Reply

Auto Informant has the right to edit or remove your comments if deemed inappropriate.