Description

  • The model designation TT stands for the Model T Truck, which captured 51% of the U.S. truck market by 1926.
  • This Model TT equipped by Howe was a popular fire truck for small town and rural fire departments.
  • Two 40-gallon chemical tanks made firefighting possible when a water source wasn’t available.   
  • The chemical reaction of mixing bicarbonate of soda and acid created pressure to expel the water in the tanks.

Story

Story

By 1926, Ford Model TT truck popularity had captured 51 percent of the U.S. truck market (by contrast, Chevrolet commanded only 1 ¾ percent).  All types of bodies were being fitted to the Model TT chassis, including ambulances, buses and fire engines.

The economy and efficiency of the Ford Model TT one-ton truck, equipped and designed by the Howe Fire Apparatus Company of Anderson, Indiana, proved to be the answer for smaller fire departments across America.  Howe equipped this truck with two 40-gallon chemical tanks, which made firefighting possible when a water source was not available. The chemical reaction of mixing bicarbonate of soda and acid created pressure to expel the water in the tanks. The pump could be utilized when low water pressure was encountered.

These features made the triple combination pumper highly practical for the special requirements of the small town and rural fire departments.  It is believed this particular Ford TT/Howe unit was first utilized by the Soledad Fire Department in West-Central California.

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