Description

  • Early Stanleys had a driving range of only 50 miles before needing a water stop.
  • Later Stanleys like this 1926 were fitted with a radiator-like condenser that changed the exhaust steam back to water, increasing the driving range to 200-300 miles.
  • Stanley steamers could not compete with gas-engine cars that were easier to start and less expensive.
  • Stanley production ended in 1927.

Story

Story

Early steamers built by the Stanley twins looked very different from the 1926 Stanley models.  The “coffin nose” hood shape which housed the boiler was stretched in 1915 to look more like the hoods on cars with radiators.  The early Stanleys had a driving range of only 50 miles before needing to make a water stop. Newer Stanleys were fitted with a radiator-like condenser that changed the exhaust steam back to water, giving them a range between 200 and 300 miles to a tank of water.

By the mid-1920s, there were numerous companies producing steamers; some relatively successful, like Doble, but some not so successful, like Baker and Stanley. In 1924, the Stanley Motor Carriage Company went into receivership and was purchased by the Steam Vehicle Corporation of America.  The new company, located in Allentown, Pennsylvania, experimented with steam trucks and buses.  By the time this 1926 Stanley was built, sales had dwindled to a trickle due to the low cost, high efficiency and easy starting of internal combustion engine cars.  Production ceased altogether in 1927.

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