Description

Description

  • This car was assigned to company founder E.L. Cord and family.
  • One of five or six special experimental Cords were built in 1936.
  • All were built for use by company officials.
  • All were prototypes for a proposed line named “baby” Duesenbergs, which did not materialize.

 

Story

Story

Born in Warrensburg, Missouri, in 1894, Errett Lobban Cord was no stranger to automobiles.  His ventures included building racing bodies on Model T Fords, operating a trucking company, becoming vice-president and general manager of the Chicago distributor for Moon cars and, in 1924, serving as general manager of the Auburn Automobile Company.  By 1929, Cord had turned the failing company into a very successful concern by purchasing several other companies, which included Duesenberg.  Wanting to produce a car bearing his own name, plans began to be drawn for a Cord automobile.

This is one of five or six special experimental Cords built in 1936 with bodies by Le Baron.  These cars were not sold to the public, but were originally designed as prototypes for a proposed line of cars dubbed the “baby” Duesenbergs, which were to have used the Auburn V-12 engine.  That project did not materialize and the cars were equipped, instead, with Cord V-8 supercharged engines.  The cars were used by company officials and this limousine was used by E.L. Cord, Mrs. Cord, and son Charles Cord.  It was later shipped from Chicago to Los Angeles where it was used by the Cords at their Beverly Hills estate until about 1940.

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