Description

  • In 1936, Hudson claimed their cars were the safest on the highway.
  • Hudsons featured strong, all-steel bodies.
  • The gear shift lever on the steering column (called the “Electric Hand”) allowed both hands to remain on the steering wheel when shifting.  
  • “Duo-Automatic” brakes had a mechanical linkage backup in case the hydraulic brakes failed.

Story

Story

The Depression took its toll on the Hudson Motor Car Company as sales decreased dramatically during the early 1930s.  When Hudson introduced the Terraplane model in 1934, profitability slowly began to return as production reached 85,835 cars, more than twice the 1933 total.  By 1935, more than 100,000 cars were built.  Many police departments and taxicab companies purchased Hudson-built automobiles during the mid-1930s.

“The safest cars on today’s highways!” was the claim for the 1936 Hudson and Terraplane selling season.  Innovative Hudson safety features included:  unitized all-steel bodies which gave added strength; a gear shift lever mounted on the steering column (called the “Electric Hand”) that allowed both hands to remain on the steering wheel when shifting; and “Duo-Automatic” brakes which provided a mechanical linkage backup in case the hydraulic brakes failed.  1936 Hudson-Terraplane production of 123,266 automobiles reflected a very successful year for the Hudson Motor Car Company.

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