Description

  • A finely restored French automobile.
  • It won Best of Class at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance in 1995.
  • The company began as brick makers in 1845 and entered the auto industry in 1894.

Story

Story

This car sports a fine, one-off French Franay convertible drop head coupe body.  It is equipped with a 160 hp, in-line 6-cylinder engine, with three Solex carburetors and 4-speed Cotal automatic transmission.  The car underwent a complete ground-up restoration in 1993-1994. It earned 99 points in the renowned 1995 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, winning “Best of Class.”  This car is considered one of the finest restored Delahayes in the world.

Delahaye was formed in 1845 as a brick-making factory and joined the automobile industry in 1894 when M. Brethon and Emile Delahaye built their first car, which was exhibited at the 1895 Paris Salon.  In 1898, Emile Delahaye joined a firm of Parisian coppersmiths to build cars in their factory.  By 1899, production was averaging 20 cars per month, overseen by chief engineer Charles Weiffenback, who remained with Delahaye until the company dissolved in 1954.  In 1931, Delahaye produced their first diesel engine truck.  The Delahaye factory, built in 1906, became one of the finest in Europe and the company became well respected for building quality automobiles.

Jean Francois joined the firm and introduced a 3.2 overhead valve 6-cylinder engine for the 1932 model year and then proceeded to develop a sports car to rival Bugatti, Delage and Talbot-Darracq.  In 1935, Delahaye acquired the Delage Company and inherited their expert racing legacy.  Postwar Delahayes included the Type 134, Type 135 and the Type 175, which was the last left-hand drive car built for the American market.  By 1951, the only car produced was the Type 235 and car sales dropped dramatically due to the French government’s strict taxation laws against large engines.  In 1954, Delahaye merged with commercial automobile manufacturer Hotchkiss and the last Delahaye trucks were made two years later.  By 1956, the famous Delahaye name disappeared forever.

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